jQuery… to hide or not to hide

Coming into this class, I only had a vague understanding of JavaScript (let alone jQuery). After this lesson and the previous one, it’s neat that everything is a lot clearer on a fundamental level. It’s also awesome how the latter gives you the ability to significantly reduce the line amount of JavaScript due to its shortcuts (being the purpose of compression-oriented library). I think it also speaks to the relative openness that developers have when it comes to sharing (Google hosting for jQuery).

I think linking the CSS and jQuery pages to change multiple aspects using jQuery at the same time is a breath of fresh air. All the while, as the lessons noted, it still presents the possibility of things getting even more hectic within the page (if they’re not grouped/organized separately and intentionally). The mouseleave functions in the lessons were also really interesting. And the .animate( ) function is a neat tool. I haven’t thought much about how the standard practices incorporate significant design insight.

I remember in class, I believe someone asked why we would intentionally have a hidden element that would be unhidden upon the user’s activity. The mouse hovering over the menu button in this case was a time for using it that I had not beforehand thought of. Toggling the fade elements for the add to cart design is another interesting function.

Reviewing the DOM method was also good. In addition to that, specifically targeting descendant elements and excluding others.

Midterm

I’m looking forward to working on and finishing my profile. My web developer is with Facebook, and his company’s attention to all of the aforementioned possibilities in crafting visually appealing and intuitive websites is verified by the amount of users that it has worldwide. That, and the criticism it receives after the slightest update or change.

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